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    40-somethings filmmaker David Lang and cabaret singer Holly Markham seem to have finally reached the end of their turbulent relationship and are about to part ways forever when Holly discovers that she's pregnant.  She's pretty sure that David is not great daddy material, but she may never have another chance to be a mom.  And David?  He's distracted by the otherworldly being he thinks he sees on their bed.

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    In The Other Side of the Wall the author recounts his experiences in Palestine as a member of a prominent organization of peace activists called the International Solidarity Movement (ISM). This controversial group, which works on the front lines of the conflict in both the West Bank and Gaza, has been accused of supporting Palestinian terrorism, but it has also been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize.

    The author witnesses the brutality of the Occupation and the countless forms of humiliations the Palestinians face on a daily basis, such as violence meted out by both soldiers and settlers, long waits at checkpoints, home demolitions, travel restrictions, unfair economic practices, arbitrary detention and arrest, and long prison sentences.

    “Richard Hardigan … has written a measured, you-are-here account, a vivid journal that takes us past slogans and ideologies.” – Philip Weiss, editor of Mondoweiss

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    From MAKING SCHOOLS SAFE, an independent report on the Horace Mann Sex Scandal and on Sex Abuse in Private Schools in general:

    "One headmaster [at Horace Mann High School] said there were no records of known reports [of teachers molesting students], not seeming to grasp that the lack of written reports is itself an indictment, since we know that students complained to school authorities. In other words, the administrators who should have recorded all complaints instead dismissed them. 'There are no documents that an investigation would turn up,' [we were told]. Knowledge and awareness, however, are not so easily lost, along with the obligation to act and speak out."

    Now that the scope of abuse has been revealed to include 62 victims of 22 abusers over decades, it’s beyond incredible that Horace Mann would have no record of the largest concentration of child sexual abuse ever in one school -- particularly one of the most prestigious private prep schools in America. Concerned alumni who gathered to understand what happened have learned as well of more than 25 reports of abuse the school received and buried over thirty years.

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    Elizabeth Jenkins, 17, raised on a Congo mission station, is under intense pressure to marry the station doctor, twenty years her senior. Hours before the wedding, Elizabeth flees. She runs toward the wider world beyond the station. She reaches Nairobi, a place of danger for a single woman without a protecting clan. Can she survive?

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    The American government wants to establish a stripped-down diplomatic post in the Equateur, the remotest part of the strife-torn Congo. No diplomatic protections. Not even diplomatic communication links. Officers assigned to staff it refuse to go. They won't serve in that "hellhole."

    Enter Fred Hunter, a young US Information Service officer just arrived from training in Belgium. Why not send him? Sink or swim. Let's see if he'll survive.

    So Fred goes alone into the Equateur, a typewriter his only friend. Quoting liberally from letters written on that typewriter, this memoir recounts the adventures of Fred's year at the edge of the jungle.

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    In the wake of the 9-11 attacks in 2001, Linda Sartor was dismayed to see her country responding primarily with military action and coercive diplomacy. Rather than isolating and defeating the perpetrators, Linda saw US action punishing the innocents in foreign lands, lending credibility to Al Qaeda's depiction of the US as an imperial state and an enemy of Islam, making enemies, and undercutting decades of effort to win the hearts and minds of people around the world.

    Linda resolved to do more than complain. For the next decade she engaged in self-styled citizen diplomacy, traveling to six war-torn countries to see for herself, and to do what she could to assist locals in their efforts to attain peace and justice.

    Linda traveled to Israel/Palestine, Iraq, Sri Lanka, Iran, Afghanistan, and Bahrain. She traveled with several different Peace and Justice organizations. And part of her story is the work of Americans and internationals to highlight injustice and to make some noise about the need for peace.

    Linda Sartor takes us behind the headlines, and she also isolates the idealism of activists from the US and other countries. She hopes that her stories will inspire readers to confront fear, to follow their hearts, and to place a bet that individual protest will, ultimately, undermine and reform the harsh imperial and economic systems that are too often accepted as a baseline "reality" when the nations of the world exercise power.

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    This book bleeds the passions of youth, racked with doubt amid blazing aspirations, words thrown to the wind, women in water, grabbing him by the roots of poetry... This is an offering, a sign, brilliantly naïve yet profound.
    — Billy Hayes
    Author of Midnight Express and The Midnight Express Letters from a Turkish Prison
    A testimony to the vitality of the poetic spirit for poets of any age or Age, and a tribute to this particular poet’s intense energy and vision . . .
    — Lee Slonimsky
    Author of Wandering Electron

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    A true backstage story! A playwright's view of the world, from the floor to the rafters. Featuring cameos by Groucho Marx, Dustin Hoffman, mom, dad, Goldie Hawn's psychic, and the Jews of Atlanta.

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    A dark and edgy look at lives in crisis, striving for peace of mind. Prose that attains the heights of poetry. Visit www.lisateasley.com for a complete list of reviews and critical acclaim.

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    Stephen Fife’s powerful lens pinpoints daily drama and delusion in our Twenty-first Century mysterium.
                —Jean-Claude van Itallie, author of America Hurrah and The Serpent

    Stephen Fife’s poems crystallize those moments when one is walking through a great city—almost always New York—taking in faces, storefronts, the great bridges and skyscrapers, and the most minute details of everyday life. There are portraits and still-lifes, glancing observations and extended meditations—a vast web of human interactions that enable us to enter this world, with pathos and understanding, as both participants and observers.
                —Nicholas Christopher

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    The book consists of rapier-like literary thrusts into the lives of General George Armstrong Custer, Thomas Andrews (the builder of the Titanic), and Edward Grey (British Foreign Secretary before World War I). However spectacular their failures, it's generally agreed that these men (or, in the case of Edward Grey, the men around them) could have avoided disaster except for arrogance - a flaw that has long characterized the imperial ambition of leaders from both countries.

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    From Anne Hutchinson to Marcel Proust, from Franz Kafka to Camille Claudel, Beth Bentley's poems range the geographies of our culture.

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    Thirteen poems that "wrestle with the 'big things' . . . love, death, birth, war. Sean Bentley is the son of Nelson Bentley, the famed poet and revered teacher of poetry at the University of Washington in Seattle. The acclaimed poet, Beth Bentley (see "Little Fires" from Cune Press) is Sean's mother. Sean spent what should have been his dissolute and rebellious teenage years attending evening poetry workshops with his father. Later, in his 20s, Sean's delayed rebellious impulses emerged as he and some questionable friends started a raucous rock 'n roll band. Grace & Desolation channels the rebellion of Bentley's rock 'n roll inside the teenager's carefully honed craft. These poems were written from what was then the safe vantage point of the US as we, as a nation, slumbered in the aftermath of the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and the First Gulf War that followed in 1991. Most of Bentley's poems are about the quiet personal dramas of ordinary life, local visits to overgrown bunkers from WWII, traveling in Italy, remembering the holocaust. A single poem recalls the Gulf War, just a few lines. Yet they have colored my memory of Bentley's book and made me think of the way that far removed foreign events are not really foreign, and not far removed.

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